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Complete Protein

by: Isabelle Faith, Health and Natural Lifestyles Inc.


Protein is essential for growth and development. It provides the body with energy and is needed for the manufacture of hormones, antibodies, enzymes and tissues. It also helps maintain the proper acid-alkali balance of the body. When protein is consumed, the body breaks it down into amino acids, the building blocks of all proteins.
 

Because of the importance of consuming proteins that provide all of the necessary amino acids, dietary proteins are considered to belong to two different groups, depending on the amino acids they provided. Complete proteins, which constitute the first group, contain ample amounts of all of the essential amino acids. These proteins are found in meat, fish, poultry, cheese, eggs, and milk. Incomplete proteins, which constitute the second group, contain only some of the essential amino acids. These proteins are found in a variety of foods, including grains, legumes, and leafy green vegetables.

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Although it is important to consume the full range of amino acids, both essential and nonessential, it is not necessary to get them from meat, fish, poultry and other complete-protein foods. In fact, because of their high fat content as well as the use of antibiotics and other chemicals used in the raising of poultry and cattle most of those foods should be eaten in moderation. Fortunately, the dietary strategy called mutual supplementation enables you to combine partial- protein foods to make complementary protein - proteins that supply adequate amounts of all the essential amino acids. For instance, although beans and brown rice are both quite rich in protein, each lacks one or more of the necessary amino acids. However, when you combine beans and brown rice with each other, or when you combine either one with any of a number of protein-rich foods, you form a complete protein that is a high-quality substitute for meat. To make a complete protein, combine beans with any one of the following:
 
Brown Rice > Seeds > Corn > Wheat > Nuts
 
Or combine brown rice with any one of the following:
 
Beans > Seeds > Nuts > Wheat
 
Most Americans eat too much protein, largely as the result of a diet high in meat and dairy products. However, if you have reduced the amount of meat and dairy foods in your diet you should make sure to get about 50 grams of protein a day. To make sure that you are getting a great enough variety of amino acids in your diet, add protein-rich foods to meals and snacks as often as possible. Eat bread with nut butters, for instance, or add nuts and seeds to salads and vegetable casseroles. Be aware that a combination of any grains, any nuts and seeds, any legumes (such as beans, peanuts, and peas), and a variety of mixed vegetables will make a complete protein.
 
All soybean products, such as tofu and soymilk, are complete proteins. They contain the essential amino acids plus several other nutrients. Available in health food stores, tofu, soy oil, soy flour, soy-based meat substitutes, soy cheese, and many other soy products are healthful ways to complement the meatless diet.
 
Yogurt is the only animal-derived complete-protein source recommended for frequent use in the diet. Made from milk that is curdled by bacteria, yogurt contains Lactobacillus acidophilus and other "friendly" bacteria needed for the digestion of foods and the prevention of many disorders, including candidiasis. Yogurt also contains vitamins A and D, and many of the B complex vitamins.
 
Do not buy the sweetened, flavored yogurts that are sold in supermarkets. These products contain added sugar and, often, preservatives. Instead, either purchase fresh unsweetened yogurt from a health food store or make the yogurt yourself, and sweeten it with fruit juices and other wholesome ingredients.


Health and Natural Lifestyles
524-42 Ave. SE
Calgary, AB T2G IY6, Canada
Phone: (403) 212-6077 Fax: (403) 212-6079


 
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